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SIMPLE AND CONVENIENT

Dosing and Administration1

For adult patients <65, ≥110 lbs, and normal kidney function:

SPRIX Nasal Spray

1 Box (5 single-day bottles)*

Sig: 1 spray in EACH nostril

every 6-8 hours as needed

Max 4 doses per day, for up to 5 days

For adult patients ≥65, <110 lbs, or with renal impairment:

SPRIX Nasal Spray

1 Box (5 single-day bottles)*

Sig: 1 spray in ONLY ONE nostril

every 6-8 hours as needed

Max 4 doses per day, for up to 5 days

SPRIX is provided

in a 5-bottle carton. Each bottle contains 8 precisely metered doses.

SPRIX can be used:

  • Every 6-8 hours
  • Up to 4 times per day
  • For up to 5 days

SPRIX is not an inhaled product; patients should hold their breath during administration.1

*Discard used SPRIX bottle after 24 hours

STORAGE1

  • Protect from light and freezing
  • Store unopened SPRIX between 2°C to 8°C (36°F to 46°F)
  • During use, keep containers of SPRIX Nasal Spray at controlled room temperature, between 15°C to 30°C (59°F to 86°F), out of direct sunlight
  • Bottles of SPRIX should be discarded within 24 hours of priming

DIRECT SAVINGS, DIRECT TO YOUR PATIENTS

SPRIX® (ketorolac tromethamine) Direct provides your patients with their medication EXCLUSIVELY through Cardinal Health Specialty Pharmacy

SPRIX Direct offers support for your patients and your practice

Support for Patients

  • Automatic $0 co-pay offer for eligible patients with commercial insurance
  • Quick home delivery of SPRIX with instructions for use

Support for Your Practice

  • Payer claim adjudication
  • Registered pharmacist available for 24-hour pharmacy support
  • Prior authorization assistance

Cardinal Health and the Cardinal Health Logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cardinal Health.

Cardinal Health Specialty Pharmacy

3 ways to prescribe sprix

FAX a SPRIX Direct prescription form, signed by the patient, to 1-844-794-7275. SPRIX Direct prescription forms are available any time. Download the prescription form

eSCRIBE by selecting Cardinal Health Specialty Pharmacy in your eScribe System to order electronically. NPI: 1528398674
7172 Columbia Gateway Dr, Columbia, MD 21046 1-888-662-6779

CALL 1-844-97-SPRIX (1-844-977-7749), Monday–Friday, from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM ET, and a licensed pharmacy technician will collect the necessary patient information.

For questions about your patient's prescription or to check on the status of a benefits investigation, send an email to sprixhcp@cardinalhealth.com or call 1-844-977-7749.

SPRIX prescriptions received by 1:00 PM ET (with no additional information needed) will be processed and shipped the same day for next day delivery.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: RISK OF SERIOUS CARDIOVASCULAR AND GASTROINTESTINAL EVENTS

Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) cause an increased risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, including myocardial infarction and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may occur early in treatment and may increase with duration of use.
  • SPRIX® is contraindicated in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery.

Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation

  • NSAIDS cause an increased risk of serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events including bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the stomach or intestines, which can be fatal. These events can occur at any time during use and without warning symptoms. Elderly patients and patients with a prior history of peptic ulcer disease and/or GI bleeding are at greater risk for serious GI events.

Indications and Usage

SPRIX® (ketorolac tromethamine) is indicated in adult patients for the short term (up to 5 days) management of moderate to moderately severe pain that requires analgesia at the opioid level.

Contraindications

SPRIX is contraindicated in the following patients:

  • Known hypersensitivity to ketorolac or any components of the drug product.
  • History of asthma, urticaria, or other allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. Severe, sometimes fatal, anaphylactic reactions to NSAIDs have been reported in such patients.
  • In the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery.
  • Use in patients with active peptic ulcer disease or with recent gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation.
  • Use as a prophylactic analgesic before any major surgery.
  • Use in patients with advanced renal disease or patients at risk for renal failure due to volume depletion.
  • Use in labor and delivery. May adversely affect fetal circulation and inhibit uterine contractions, thus increasing the risk of uterine hemorrhage.
  • Use in patients with suspected or confirmed cerebrovascular bleeding, hemorrhagic diathesis, incomplete hemostasis, or those for whom hemostasis is critical.
  • Concomitant use with probenecid or pentoxifylline.

Warnings and Precautions

Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events: increased risk of serious cardiovascular (CV) thrombotic events, including myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, which can be fatal. Contraindicated in the setting of CABG. Patients treated with NSAIDs in the post-MI period were at increased risk of reinfarction, CV-related death, and all-cause mortality beginning in the first week of treatment.

Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation: contraindicated in patients with active peptic ulcers and/or GI bleeding and in patients with recent gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation. Can cause serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events including inflammation, bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, or large intestine, which can be fatal. These serious adverse events can occur at any time, with or without warning symptoms. Patients with a prior history of peptic ulcer disease and/or GI bleeding who used NSAIDs had a greater than 10-fold increased risk for developing a GI bleed compared to patients without these risk factors.

Hepatotoxicity: Inform patients of warning signs and symptoms of hepatotoxicity. Discontinue if abnormal liver tests persist or worsen or if clinical signs and symptoms of liver disease develop.

Hypertension: NSAIDs, including SPRIX, can lead to new onset or worsening of preexisting hypertension. Patients taking some antihypertensive medications may have impaired response to these therapies when taking NSAIDs. Monitor blood pressure.

Heart Failure and Edema: Avoid use of SPRIX in patients with severe heart failure unless benefits are expected to outweigh risk of worsening heart failure.

Renal Toxicity and Hyperkalemia: Monitor renal function in patients with renal or hepatic impairment, heart failure, dehydration, or hypovolemia. Avoid use of SPRIX in patients with advanced renal disease unless benefits are expected to outweigh risk of worsening renal function.

Anaphylactic Reactions: Seek emergency help if an anaphylactic reaction occurs.

Exacerbation of Asthma Related to Aspirin Sensitivity: Contraindicated in patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma. Monitor patients with preexisting asthma (without known aspirin sensitivity).

Serious Skin Reactions: NSAIDs, including SPRIX, can cause serious skin reactions, which can be fatal. Discontinue SPRIX at first appearance of skin rash or other signs of hypersensitivity.

Premature Closure of Fetal Ductus Arteriosus: Avoid use in pregnant women starting at 30 weeks gestation.

Hematologic Toxicity: Monitor hemoglobin or hematocrit in patients with any signs or symptoms of anemia. Do not use SPRIX in patients for whom hemostasis is critical.

Limitations of Use: SPRIX should not be used concomitantly with IM/IV or oral ketorolac, aspirin, or other NSAIDs.

Adverse Reactions

Serious adverse reactions include: cardiovascular thrombotic events; GI bleeding, ulceration and perforation; hepatotoxicity; hypertension; heart failure and edema; renal toxicity and hyperkalemia; anaphylactic reactions; serious skin reactions; hematologic toxicity.

The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥2%) in patients treated with SPRIX and occurring at a rate at least twice that with placebo include: nasal discomfort; rhinalgia; increased lacrimation; throat irritation; oliguria; rash; bradycardia; decreased urine output; increased ALT and/or AST; hypertension; rhinitis.

In controlled clinical trials in major surgery, primarily knee and hip replacements and abdominal hysterectomies, 1.5% of patients treated with SPRIX experienced serious adverse events of bleeding or hematoma at the operative site versus 0.4% of patients treated with placebo who experienced hematoma.

In patients taking ketorolac or other NSAIDs in clinical trials, the most frequently reported adverse reactions in approximately 1% to 10% of patients are:

Gastrointestinal (GI): abdominal pain, constipation/diarrhea, dyspepsia, flatulence, GI fullness, GI ulcers (gastric/duodenal), gross bleeding/perforation, heartburn, nausea (incidence >10%), stomatitis, vomiting.

Other: abnormal renal function, anemia, dizziness, drowsiness, edema, elevated liver enzymes, headache (incidence >10%), hypertension, increased bleeding time, injection site pain, pruritus, purpura, rash, tinnitus, sweating.

Drug Interactions

Drugs that interfere with hemostasis: increased risk of serious bleeding with use of anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs); concomitant use with pentoxifylline is contraindicated.

ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and beta-blockers: may diminish the antihypertensive effect of these drugs; monitor blood pressure.

ACE Inhibitors and ARBs: In elderly, volume depleted, or those with renal impairment may result in deterioration of renal function; monitor for signs of worsening renal function.

Diuretics: reduces the natriuretic effect of loop diuretics (e.g., furosemide) and thiazide diuretics in some patients.

Digoxin: has been reported to increase the serum concentration and prolong the half-life of digoxin.

Use in Specific Populations

Pregnancy: Use of NSAIDs during the third trimester of pregnancy increases the risk of premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus. Avoid use of NSAIDs in pregnant women starting at 30 weeks gestation.

Infertility: NSAIDs are associated with reversible infertility. Consider withdrawal of SPRIX in women who have difficulties conceiving.

Overdosage

Symptoms following acute NSAID overdosages have been typically limited to lethargy, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, and epigastric pain, which have been generally reversible with supportive care. Gastrointestinal bleeding has occurred. Hypertension, acute renal failure, respiratory depression, and coma have occurred, but were rare.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning.

Reference

  1. SPRIX® [package insert]. Wayne, PA : Egalet US Inc. 2016.

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

Indications and Usage

SPRIX® (ketorolac tromethamine) is indicated in adult patients for the short term (up to 5 days) management of moderate to moderately severe pain that requires analgesia at the opioid level.

WARNING: RISK OF SERIOUS CARDIOVASCULAR AND GASTROINTESTINAL EVENTS

Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) cause an increased risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, including myocardial infarction and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may occur early in treatment and may increase with duration of use.
  • SPRIX® is contraindicated in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery.

Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation

  • NSAIDS cause an increased risk of serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events including bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the stomach or intestines, which can be fatal. These events can occur at any time during use and without warning symptoms. Elderly patients and patients with a prior history of peptic ulcer disease and/or GI bleeding are at greater risk for serious GI events.

Contraindications

SPRIX is contraindicated in the following patients:

  • Known hypersensitivity to ketorolac or any components of the drug product.
  • History of asthma, urticaria, or other allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. Severe, sometimes fatal, anaphylactic reactions to NSAIDs have been reported in such patients.
  • In the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery.
  • Use in patients with active peptic ulcer disease or with recent gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation.
  • Use as a prophylactic analgesic before any major surgery.
  • Use in patients with advanced renal disease or patients at risk for renal failure due to volume depletion.
  • Use in labor and delivery. May adversely affect fetal circulation and inhibit uterine contractions, thus increasing the risk of uterine hemorrhage.
  • Use in patients with suspected or confirmed cerebrovascular bleeding, hemorrhagic diathesis, incomplete hemostasis, or those for whom hemostasis is critical.
  • Concomitant use with probenecid or pentoxifylline.

Warnings and Precautions

Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events: increased risk of serious cardiovascular (CV) thrombotic events, including myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, which can be fatal. Contraindicated in the setting of CABG. Patients treated with NSAIDs in the post-MI period were at increased risk of reinfarction, CV-related death, and all-cause mortality beginning in the first week of treatment.

Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation: contraindicated in patients with active peptic ulcers and/or GI bleeding and in patients with recent gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation. Can cause serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events including inflammation, bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, or large intestine, which can be fatal. These serious adverse events can occur at any time, with or without warning symptoms. Patients with a prior history of peptic ulcer disease and/or GI bleeding who used NSAIDs had a greater than 10-fold increased risk for developing a GI bleed compared to patients without these risk factors.

Hepatotoxicity: Inform patients of warning signs and symptoms of hepatotoxicity. Discontinue if abnormal liver tests persist or worsen or if clinical signs and symptoms of liver disease develop.

Hypertension: NSAIDs, including SPRIX, can lead to new onset or worsening of preexisting hypertension. Patients taking some antihypertensive medications may have impaired response to these therapies when taking NSAIDs. Monitor blood pressure.

Heart Failure and Edema: Avoid use of SPRIX in patients with severe heart failure unless benefits are expected to outweigh risk of worsening heart failure.

Renal Toxicity and Hyperkalemia: Monitor renal function in patients with renal or hepatic impairment, heart failure, dehydration, or hypovolemia. Avoid use of SPRIX in patients with advanced renal disease unless benefits are expected to outweigh risk of worsening renal function.

Anaphylactic Reactions: Seek emergency help if an anaphylactic reaction occurs.

Exacerbation of Asthma Related to Aspirin Sensitivity: Contraindicated in patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma. Monitor patients with preexisting asthma (without known aspirin sensitivity).

Serious Skin Reactions: NSAIDs, including SPRIX, can cause serious skin reactions, which can be fatal. Discontinue SPRIX at first appearance of skin rash or other signs of hypersensitivity.

Premature Closure of Fetal Ductus Arteriosus: Avoid use in pregnant women starting at 30 weeks gestation.

Hematologic Toxicity: Monitor hemoglobin or hematocrit in patients with any signs or symptoms of anemia. Do not use SPRIX in patients for whom hemostasis is critical.

Limitations of Use: SPRIX should not be used concomitantly with IM/IV or oral ketorolac, aspirin, or other NSAIDs.

Adverse Reactions

Serious adverse reactions include: cardiovascular thrombotic events; GI bleeding, ulceration and perforation; hepatotoxicity; hypertension; heart failure and edema; renal toxicity and hyperkalemia; anaphylactic reactions; serious skin reactions; hematologic toxicity.

The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥2%) in patients treated with SPRIX and occurring at a rate at least twice that with placebo include: nasal discomfort; rhinalgia; increased lacrimation; throat irritation; oliguria; rash; bradycardia; decreased urine output; increased ALT and/or AST; hypertension; rhinitis.

In controlled clinical trials in major surgery, primarily knee and hip replacements and abdominal hysterectomies, 1.5% of patients treated with SPRIX experienced serious adverse events of bleeding or hematoma at the operative site versus 0.4% of patients treated with placebo who experienced hematoma.

In patients taking ketorolac or other NSAIDs in clinical trials, the most frequently reported adverse reactions in approximately 1% to 10% of patients are:

Gastrointestinal (GI): abdominal pain, constipation/diarrhea, dyspepsia, flatulence, GI fullness, GI ulcers (gastric/duodenal), gross bleeding/perforation, heartburn, nausea (incidence >10%), stomatitis, vomiting.

Other: abnormal renal function, anemia, dizziness, drowsiness, edema, elevated liver enzymes, headache (incidence >10%), hypertension, increased bleeding time, injection site pain, pruritus, purpura, rash, tinnitus, sweating.

Drug Interactions

Drugs that interfere with hemostasis: increased risk of serious bleeding with use of anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs); concomitant use with pentoxifylline is contraindicated.

ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and beta-blockers: may diminish the antihypertensive effect of these drugs; monitor blood pressure.

ACE Inhibitors and ARBs: In elderly, volume depleted, or those with renal impairment may result in deterioration of renal function; monitor for signs of worsening renal function.

Diuretics: reduces the natriuretic effect of loop diuretics (e.g., furosemide) and thiazide diuretics in some patients.

Digoxin: has been reported to increase the serum concentration and prolong the half-life of digoxin.

Use in Specific Populations

Pregnancy: Use of NSAIDs during the third trimester of pregnancy increases the risk of premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus. Avoid use of NSAIDs in pregnant women starting at 30 weeks gestation.

Infertility: NSAIDs are associated with reversible infertility. Consider withdrawal of SPRIX in women who have difficulties conceiving.

Overdosage

Symptoms following acute NSAID overdosages have been typically limited to lethargy, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, and epigastric pain, which have been generally reversible with supportive care. Gastrointestinal bleeding has occurred. Hypertension, acute renal failure, respiratory depression, and coma have occurred, but were rare.